Do not Flea with Fleas.

by Barbara Lietke on 01/21/2018

Category: Pest Control,
While you are outdoors enjoying the warm weather with your furry friend this season, chances are, fleas are enjoying your pet. Fleas are tiny insects that live in yards and on animals that take blood meals from hosts. While incredibly small, they possess 6 long powerful legs enabling them to jump up to 6 feet from the ground and onto your pet. While fleas prefer our furry friends, they will also bite humans when a home becomes infested. Some common signs of a flea infestation include an itchy, scratching pet. If you notice your animal scratching more than usual check them for the presence of fleas.  Fleas typically prefer the hindquarters and rear of dogs and around the neck on cats. Another sign is finding flea feces- small reddish black particles in the fur that resemble specks of dirt. Why worry about fleas? Fleas can pose a serious problem for your pet's health. Not only can fleas make your pet miserable, but depending on his age and overall physical condition, fleas can...

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Fall Spider Control Tips

by Barbara Lietke on 01/21/2018

Category: Seasonal,
Fall Spider Control Tips
Fall Spider Control Tips With Halloween right around the corner, chances are you’re going to be seeing spiders everywhere you turn. With some handy tips from the professionals at Midwest Exterminating, you can make sure that the only creepy-crawlies in your home are for decoration. As the weather turns colder, it isn’t just us humans who want to spend all of our time indoors in the cozy warmth. Spiders need shelter too and move inside in the fall as well. While most spiders are relatively harmless, they are nonetheless the most feared of all pests, and understandably so. Those who come in contact with a Brown Recluse or a Black Widow spider and get bitten can sometimes require hospital treatment and bites have occasionally even resulted in death.  The good news is that with some spider know-how and easy preventative measures, you can prevent that from happening. About Spiders Spiders belong to a class of insects called Arachnids. All Arachnids have eight legs and...

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Giant Asian Hornets

by Barbara Lietke on 01/21/2018

Category: Pest Control,
Giant Asian Hornets
Perhaps you’ve heard about a Giant Asian Hornet having been spotted in Arlington Heights, Illinois recently. So what is the buzz on this potentially deadly behemoth? Giant Asian Hornets (Vespa mandarinia) originate in Asia and are quickly spreading across the globe. There are reports of infestations in Alabama, California, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, and West Virginia. Climate change and global shipping are believed to be the culprit behind the spread.  So what makes this new invader so unique? Giant Asian Hornets (also known as Japanese Giant Hornets) are the largest hornets in the world. The average specimen grows to 2.2 inches in length and is the width of a human thumb. They can travel 60 miles per day at speeds of nearly 25 miles per hour. It is a ruthless predator that kills other hornet species, yellow jackets, bees,...

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Brown Recluse Spiders

by Barbara Lietke on 01/21/2018

Category: Pest Control,
Brown Recluse Spiders
There has been a lot of buzz this past summer surrounding insects in the news, from the Giant Asian Hornets spotted in Arlington Heights to the Cicada Killer Wasps found across the Midwest.  Another perennially terrifying, misunderstood, and pervasive inhabitant of our area is the Brown Recluse Spider. Perhaps no other American spider has fostered so many myths and misrepresentations as the brown recluse. Identifying: True to its name, the brown recluse is both brown and reclusive. The body of an adult brown recluse is light brown, except for a darker, violin-shaped marking on the back, immediately behind its eyes. This mark helps identify the spider, though it is not present in young brown recluses. An even more important identifier is the number and arrangement of the eyes. Unlike most spiders which have eight eyes, brown recluse spiders have six eyes arranged in three pairs. Habitat: Brown Recluse Spiders are most active at night. During the day they are especially fond of...

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